Home forums Post Processing Rocks and trees – FAIL

4 replies, 3 voices Last updated by  John Planck 6 months, 3 weeks ago
  • John Planck
    Moderator
    @jbplanck
    #194

    I took some photos last summer of the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains in NY. Huge rocks some the size of small houses. I don’t like how they turned out at all. Lay it on me with CC. Composition? Subject? Technical? I have tried some B&W post processing and like them slightly better. What would you do to post process these photos? Or do I need to rethink how I captured them? It was great except in August I was eaten alive by bugs! A few photo links for reference.

    Allegany 1
    Allegany 2
    Allegany 3

    • This topic was modified 7 months ago by  John Planck.
    • This topic was modified 7 months ago by  John Planck.
    • This topic was modified 7 months ago by  John Planck.
    • This topic was modified 7 months ago by  John Planck.
    Timothy Griffin
    Keymaster
    @t12griffin
    #205

    HI John, At first look , my first thought was HDR or fill flash. I think you need something to bring out the details in the rocks. From a composition point , change the angle. maybe down on the ground shooting up( but then you have to watch the sky). It just means you have to go back and shoot it again. From a processing point,maybe a selection of just the rock face to brighten just that part without changing the balance of the image. Adjustment brush in Lightroom or Quick Select and mask on a layer if in Photoshop.

    John Planck
    Moderator
    @jbplanck
    #214

    Thanks Tim. I’m hearing more light on the rocks, lower angle perspective, and bring out more detail in the rocks. That is good feedback and I agree. May try this location again in mid-June. I will try some edits on my current collection this weekend bumping up the exposure on the rocks, and pulling some more detail (sharpness/clarity) out of the rocks.

    paul s
    Participant
    @shark
    #236

    I’m with Tim on the processing in that there is a wide range of very dark to quite bright in the images – something hdr could help with. You can actually ‘fake’ an hdr from a single image john. Just make 2 virtual copies in Lightroom or Photoshop. Process the original as neutral, one for the brights, and one for the darks. Then blend the 3 either with layer masks if you’re comfortable with it, or with an HDR tool. In this case, given the spotty nature i would think an HDR tool would be easier. Things like a sunset with a horizon, ‘bottom’ and ‘top’ i would lean towards a layer mask personally as i think they blend better. As you said, black and white can also help with that stuff but still tend to look better with an overall good balance of tones IMO.

    As for composition, thats more of a personal choice for what *you* like, assuming you are shooting for your own pleasure vs commercial avenues. I also agree with Tim here in that different angles can help. I tend to favor low personally as i feel it adds a lot more depth. When i am shooting i often think back to something I heard Scott Kelby say – ‘your image should not look like you walked up and snapped a photo that anyone else in the same spot would take’. I always have knee pads and mud boots with me 🙂

    looks like a nice area with lots of good photo opportunities 🙂

    John Planck
    Moderator
    @jbplanck
    #246

    Thank you for the input Pauls. I have been using the NIK HDR app a lot lately and need to revisit these photos with that. As for composition, yes lower when I get back there. Thanks again 😉

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